linkedin
like us on facebook
Focusing on Criminal Law
CONTACT US : 561.447.4011 | email us
news 2007
Law Offices of Guy Fronstin
1075 Broken Sound Parkway, NW
Suite 102
Boca Raton, FL 33487
TEL: 561.447.4011
Email: info@fronstinlaw.com

Media News 2007

www.bochichiomemorial.com - June - December 2007 / Mother mysteriously killed, By Michael Laforgia
More than three months after his mother was mysteriously killed near a park west of Delray Beach, Daniel Gorenberg is still grieving every day, said his family attorney Guy Fronstin. He's withdrawn and depressed Fronstin said. He and his mother were extremely close, as close as a mother and son could be. Yet, the 25 year old's behavior in the hours and days following the slaying of Randi Gorenberg continues to intrigue sheriff's detectives. Fronstin said the father and son already have answered questions in person and through a questionnaire. He acknowledged that Daniel Gorenberg's behaviors could be construed as suspicious by his actions and are all explainable. Daniel has nothing to do with this, Fronstin said. Fronstin explained that there isn't anything unusual about Daniel Gorenberg pacing and smoking on the driveway of his parent's home. He's is not allowed to smoke inside. As for him failing to turn over his shoes and belt, Fronstin said the son gave detectives everything he had. Investigators had a chance to go through his room in the three searches of the house, Fronstin said. Fronstin declined to comment on why Daniel Gorenberg told detectives he was working at the store at the time of the homicide, even though detectives said he wasn't.
Gorenberg Memorial - December 2007

Gorenberg Memorial

MURDER INQUIRY IN A 'BIND' (7/7/07)
DIGEST (8/29/07)
SLAIN WOMAN'S SON FACES PRESCRIPTION CHARGE (08/29/07)
SILENCE HURTS SLAYING PROBE, OFFICIALS SAY (9/20/07)
DIGEST (10/26/07)
SLAYING VICTIM'S SON HELD ON PRESCRIPTION DRUG CHARGES (10/26/07)

Gorenberg, Florence, of Delray Beach passed away June 4, 2007.
Formerly of Sheepshead Bay, NY
"DEDICATED HER LIFE TO HER FAMILY."

Loving wife of the late Joseph to whom she was married to for 47 years; adored mother of Stewart and the late Randi Gorenberg , Lori & Arnold Wallis and Robert Gorenberg; cherished grandmother of Daniel, Sarie, Michelle & Naomi; beloved sister of Roz Cohen and Sylvia Brenner.

GUTTERMAN WARHEIT MEMORIAL CHAPEL
Boca Raton West Palm Beach
Metropolitan New York
800-992-9262.

-

MURDER INQUIRY IN A 'BIND' - DISCREPANCY SUGGESTED IN WARRANT
South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL) - July 7, 2007
Author: Leon Fooksman

More than three months after his mother was mysteriously killed near a park west of Delray Beach, Daniel Gorenberg is still grieving every day, his family's attorney said.

"He's withdrawn and depressed," attorney Guy Fronstin said. "He and his mother were extremely close, as close as a mother and son could be." Yet the 25-year-old's behavior in the hours and days following the slaying of Randi Gorenberg , who lived west of Boca Raton, on March 23 continues to intrigue sheriffs detectives.

Two hours after the homicide, deputies spotted Daniel Gorenberg quickly driving his Volkswagen car into his parent's garage, opening the trunk and removing a spray bottle and roll of paper towels, according to a search warrant obtained by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Minutes later, he paced on his parent's driveway, ran his hands through his hair, smoked a cigarette and was "displaying visible signs of stress," the document said.

At that time, detectives had not notified the family that Randi Gorenberg was shot and pushed out of her Mercedes SUV at Gov. Lawton Chiles Memorial Park off Jog Road.

More questions followed the next day when Daniel Gorenberg turned over to investigators only some of the attire he wore on the day of his mother's death. Deputies saw him a day earlier wearing black shoes and a black belt, but he gave detectives white shoes and no belt, the document said.

Two days later, he claimed to have been working at a Boca Raton jewelry store at the time of the homicide, the warrant said.

The store had no record of him working there that day, the warrant said.

Sgt. Rick McAfee said Daniel Gorenberg is not a suspect in the high-profile slaying, which was featured on America's Most Wanted. There are no suspects yet, he said.

Still, McAfee said, he wants Daniel Gorenberg and his father, Fort Lauderdale-based chiropractor Dr. Stewart Gorenberg, to be more helpful. They have not been willing recently to sit down with detectives and answer more questions about their whereabouts that day, he said.

"We're in a tremendous bind," McAfee said.

Fronstin said the father and son already have answered questions in person and through a questionnaire. He acknowledged that Daniel Gorenberg's behaviors could be construed as suspicious but his actions are all explainable.

"Daniel has nothing to do with this," Fronstin said.

On March 23, Randi Gorenberg, 52, a mother of two who lived in a $2.2 million home in the Boniello Acres community west of Boca Raton, left the Town Center Mall in Boca Raton alone in her SUV at 1:16 p.m., detectives said.

At 1:54 p.m., a passer-by reported hearing two gunshots and seeing the mother's body pushed from her SUV.

Five minutes later, surveillance cameras captured the SUV entering the Home Depot parking lot at Atlantic Avenue and Jog Road. The vehicle was left there, but the cameras did not clearly show who was behind the wheel.

Detectives are still poring through surveillance footage, awaiting DNA analysis and considering working with the U.S. Attorney's Office to broaden the scope of the investigation, McAfee said. Yet the number of detectives assigned to the case has been reduced from six to two because there are other unsolved killings needing attention, he said.

The pace of the investigation has upset Randi Gorenberg 's brother, Jerry Malitz, who lives in Washington, D.C.

The Sheriff's Office turned down his request for a copy of the Home Depot surveillance video so a family member with a production company could review it, he said. And detectives did not initially interview people the family recommended who could know something about the killing, he said.

"I'm frustrated both by the seemingly lack of progress and them seemingly not being as forthcoming with the family as they were the first week," Malitz said.

McAfee said the video was not handed over because his agency didn't want a family member reviewing it, a potential for a conflict in court if an arrest is make. Detectives have not talked to everyone Malitz's family suggested because they still want to talk further to Daniel and Stewart Gorenberg.

"The rhythm and rhyme of what we do to a layman may seem like we're dragging our feet. But there's a process we use and it's a thinking of two or three steps ahead," McAfee said.

Fronstin explained that there isn't anything unusual about Daniel Gorenberg pacing and smoking on the driveway of his parent's home. He's not allowed to smoke inside.

As for him failing to turnover his shoes and belt, the attorney said the son gave detectives everything he had. Investigators had a chance to go through his room in the three searches of the house, he said.

Fronstin declined to comment on why Daniel Gorenberg told detectives he was working at the store at the time of the homicide, even though detectives said he wasn't.

Malitz remembers his sister being a "champion" to Daniel Gorenberg and would always support him and care for him.

The son had studied criminology at the University of South Florida and planned to become a police officer, he said.

-

DIGEST
South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL) - August 29, 2007
Author: STAFF REPORTS

Delray Beach

Man arrested in attempt to get prescription drugs

The son of a West Boca woman mysteriously killed near a park has been arrested for fraudulently trying to obtain prescription drugs, police say.

Daniel Gorenberg, 25, was arrested Monday at a Walgreens in Delray Beach after he tried to get Xanax, police say.

His mother, Randi Gorenberg , 52, was shot to death and dumped on a back road near The Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden Park on March 23. Her slaying remains unsolved.

Palm Beach County sheriff's detectives have said Daniel Gorenberg and his father, chiropractor Stewart Gorenberg, need to be more helpful in the homicide investigation. Neither has been willing to answer more questions about their whereabouts on the day of the slaying. Daniel Gorenberg was charged with an attempt to obtain a controlled substance.

-

SLAIN WOMAN'S SON FACES PRESCRIPTION CHARGE
Palm Beach Post, The (FL) - August 29, 2007
Author: MICHAEL LaFORGIA, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

The son of Randi Gorenberg, the suburban Boca Raton woman who was fatally shot in the head and thrown from her black Mercedes west of the city in March, was arrested Monday on a prescription drug charge.

Daniel Gorenberg, whose mother's murder has gone unsolved these five months, despite efforts of Palm Beach County sheriff's detectives, walked into a Walgreens on South Federal Highway about 7:20 p.m. and tried to fill a fake prescription for Xanax, according to his arrest affidavit. The 25-year-old man was booked into the county jail about12:30 a.m. on a charge of attempting to obtain a controlled substance by fraud. He was released on bond at about 3 p.m. Tuesday.

Gorenberg's attorney,Guy Fronstin, said the arrest shows how profoundly his client was affected by his mother's death.

"He's been struggling every day since this murder. I think his arrest last night is an indication that Daniel's not thinking clearly," Fronstin said. "I think it's got to be put in context."

Randi Gorenberg , 52, was a prominent member of the close-knit Jewish community west of Boca Raton. She lived with her husband, Stewart, a Fort Lauderdale chiropractor, and son in a 7,OOO-square-foot home in Boniello Acres, near Clint Moore and Jog roads. Her daughter, Sarie Gorenberg, attends the University of Florida in Gainesville.

The last images of her were captured by a security camera at the Town Center mall in Boca Raton on the afternoon of March 23, 39 minutes before she was killed. The footage showed her pause with a cell phone to her ear before striding to her car, a characteristic bounce in her step.

At 1:54 p.m., a witness at Gov. Lawton Chiles Memorial Park near Jog and Morikami Park roads heard gunshots and saw the woman pushed to the street from her black Mercedes GL 450. She lay facedown and bleeding on the asphalt as bystanders dialed 911.

Five minutes later, at a Home Depot at Jog and Atlantic Avenue, a security camera trained on the southeast corner of the parking lot recorded the Mercedes as it flashed by and turned left toward Atlantic.

A sheriff's community service aide found the Mercedes abandoned behind the hardware store, less than 2 miles from the crime scene, about an hour after the shooting.

Forensic investigators found blood and fingerprints inside the SUV but gleaned few clues from them.

Gorenberg's $600 Kooba purse, cell phone and black-and-white Puma sneakers -she was thrown from the Mercedes in her socks -have never been found.

The killer remains on the loose.

In the weeks following Gorenberg's death, sheriff's investigators expressed frustration with her family, citing a lack of cooperation from Daniel and his father, Stewart.

Members of the family, in turn, are frustrated that the sheriff's office hasn't made more progress, Fronstin said.

Not long after the murder, family members quit dealing with sheriff's investigators face-to-face and directed detectives' questions through Fronstin, who was hired as family spokesman in late March.

Neither Stewart Gorenberg nor his son has sat for a formal interview with detectives, said sheriff's Sgt. Rick McAfee, whose violent crimes squad is handling the investigation.

"It's definitely a huge hurdle," McAfee said. "We can't 100 percent rule out that they didn't have any involvement. We can't rule that out."

Sheriff's investigators said Daniel Gorenberg, whom family members say struggled with substance abuse in the past, lied about his alibi on the day his mother was killed.

He told authorities he was working at a shop that cuts diamond saw bits on the afternoon of March 23, but his employer told detectives he never showed up for work.

Sheriff's investigators learned of Daniel Gorenberg's arrest Tuesday, McAfee said.

After he was taken into custody Monday, a Delray Beach police officer took him to the police station's temporary holding area and interviewed him, according to reports.

Afterward, the officer noted, Daniel Gorenberg's attorney, Fronstin, called the officer and asked him "not to question his client anymore."

-

SILENCE HURTS SLAYING PROBE, OFFICIALS SAY
Palm Beach Post, The (FL) - September 20, 2007
Author: MICHAEL LaFORGlA, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

The mother and brother of a wealthy suburban Boca Raton woman who was murdered six months ago met with top sheriff's officials Wednesday to encourage cooperation between the victim's family and frustrated detectives.

The investigation into the March 23 murder of Randi Gorenberg , 52, a wife and mother who was shot in a park west of Delray Beach, has been hindered in recent months, the Palm Beach County Sheriffs Office says. The reason, the sheriffs office says: Gorenberg's husband, Stewart, and son, Daniel, have refused to meet with detectives and answer questions.

Their refusal to cooperate has baffled investigators and some family members alike, who can't understand why two men, whose wife and mother was taken so violently, would fail to do everything in their power to bring her killer to justice.

Gorenberg's brother, Jerry Malitz, 56, couldn't be reached Wednesday. Sheriffs investigators said they were pleased with the meeting's outcome but held out little hope that Malitz or his mother, Idey Elias, could persuade relatives to talk.

Neither Stewart Gorenberg, 52, a Fort Lauderdale chiropractor, nor his 25-year-old son, who last month was arrested on a prescription drug charge, will speak to detectives. Instead they've directed all questions to Guy Fronstin, a West Palm Beach attorney whom Stewart Gorenberg hired after his wife's murder.

The unusual move has been frustrating, detectives said. The family, in turn, is upset that investigators haven't made more progress in the case.

Sheriff's Sgt. Rick McAfee, whose violent crimes squad is handling the investigation, said Wednesday that detectives shouldn't have to send reminders. "It's an open invitation. He (Fronstin) knows we want to sit down and talk to them," McAfee said, adding: "I don't know if it's going to take place."

-

DIGEST
South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL) - October 26, 2007
Author: Staff reports

Palm Beach County

Son of slain woman faces more drug charges

The son of a West Boca woman mysteriously killed in March in a park faces more charges for illegally trying to buy prescription drugs in August, an arrest report said.

Daniel Gorenberg, 25, was booked in the Palm Beach County Jail on Thursday on two counts of obtain/acquire a controlled substance by misrepresentation.

He was also arrested in August for allegedly trying to fraudulently obtain prescription Xanax in a Walgreens in Delray Beach.

His mother, Randi Gorenberg , 52, was shot to death and dumped on a back road near The Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden Park on March 23.

Sheriff's detectives have said Daniel Gorenberg and his father, chiropractor Stewart Gorenberg, need to be more helpful in the homicide investigation

-

SLAYING VICTIM'S SON HELD ON PRESCRIPTION DRUG CHARGES
Palm Beach Post, The (FL) - October 26, 2007
Author: MICHAEL LaFORGIA, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

The troubled son of a woman whose sensational murder has gone unsolved for the past seven months was taken into custody Thursday on prescription drug charges in his second such arrest since August.

On Aug. 28, Daniel Gorenberg, 25, was jailed by Delray Beach police after a city pharmacist suspected him of trying to fill a fake prescription for Xanax. The next day, agents with the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office pharmaceutical crimes unit got a tip that Gorenberg had used similarly suspicious prescriptions for Xanax and Valium at a Walgreens store on South Federal Highway in Delray Beach. Two months later, investigators swore out a warrant for his arrest on charges of attempting to obtain a controlled substance by fraud.

His attorney,Guy Fronstin, said Thursday's arrest was another sign of how profoundly his client was affected by the loss of his mother.

Randi Gorenberg , 52, was a popular member of the close-knit Jewish community west of Boca Raton. On the afternoon of March 23, she was shot in the head and pushed from her Mercedes sport utility vehicle in a park west of Delray Beach, near Jog and Morikami Park roads.

An hour later, authorities discovered her bloodstained SUV abandoned behind the Home Depot store at Jog Road and Atlantic Avenue.

Certain details of the slaying have intrigued detectives.

The last recorded images of Randi Gorenberg showed her holding a cellphone to her ear as she strode from the Town Center at Boca Raton mall 39 minutes before she was killed; five minutes after the crime, Home Depot security cameras captured fleeting video of her SUV, apparently driven by her killer; and several things the victim carried that day remain missing, including her Kooba purse, wallet, cellphone, shopping bags and, most curiously, her black-and-white Puma sneakers.

The killer remains on the loose.

Since the slaying, Fronstin said, Daniel Gorenberg had slipped into drug abuse as a means of coping. However, the attorney added, the son had been improving since his arrest in Delray Beach.

"It's a shame that the detectives are coming after him now," Fronstin said.

That sentiment hints at tension that developed between homicide detectives and Randi Gorenberg 's family in the weeks after her death.

Investigators first spoke to the victim's husband, Stewart Gorenberg, 52, a Fort Lauderdale chiropractor, last week.

Previously, both father and son had referred questions to Fronstin, and the delay had hindered the investigation, detectives said.

"There's been some new open dialogue between Stewart and us," said Sgt. Rick McAfee, whose violent crimes squad is handling the case. "I'd say his attitude has changed 180 degrees."

SunSentinal.com - November 2, 2007 / Doctor Charged with Drug Trafficking, By Sofia Santana Staff Writer and Staff Writers Bob LaMendola and Brian Haas and Staff Researcher William Lucey

Doctor Charged with Drug Trafficking, Police say practitioner bought Vicodin from informant in theater parking lot

Fort Lauderdale — A local doctor was charged with trafficking in prescription pain killers after police said he bought 100 Vicodin pills illegally from a police informant.

Alan G. Schwartz, 43, of Fort Lauderdale, was arrested Oct. 26. He has been released from the Broward County Jail on $825,000 bail.

Schwartz is an internal medicine and lung specialist at the Fort Lauderdale firm of Coopersmith & Scott & Schwartz.

Schwartz's attorney, Guy Fronstin, said Thursday that Schwartz "unfortunately suffers from an addiction but is taking a very aggressive and proactive approach to recovery."

At about 5 p.m. Oct. 26, Schwartz met the police informant in the parking lot of the AMC Movie Theater at 3200 N. Federal Highway, got into the informant's car and gave the informant $350 in exchange for the Vicodin, police said.

Seconds later, Fort Lauderdale police narcotic detectives who had been monitoring and recording the meeting surrounded the car and arrested Schwartz, according to an arrest report filed by police.

Detectives said that after the arrest they searched Schwartz's car, which was parked nearby, and found 94 oxycodone pills and 62 additional pills of Vicodin, which contains hydrocodone and acetaminophen, in unmarked bottles.

The amount of pills police said they seized exceeded the legal limit required for drug possession charges, so police instead charged Schwartz with drug trafficking.

The pills typically sell for $2 to $4 each in a pharmacy if purchased without insurance, and the price often doubles or triples when the pills are sold on the black market, authorities said.

ABC News - October 16, 2007 / Women May Sue Millionaire in Sex Case, By Scott Michels

Women May Sue Millionaire in Sex Case

A number of young women who say they went to the Palm Beach, Fla. mansion of Jeffrey Epstein, the multimillionaire investor charged with soliciting prostitutes, are threatening to file civil lawsuits against Epstein, sources familiar with the case told ABC News. Guy Fronstin, another of Epstein's lawyers, declined to comment.

Palm Beach Post - September 20, 2007 / Slaying victim's son held on Prescription Drug Charges, By Michael Laforgia

Slaying victim's son held on Prescription Drug Charges

The troubled son of a woman whose sensational murder has gone unsolved for the past seven months was taken into custody Thursday on prescription drug charges in his second such arrest since August. His Attorney, Guy Fronstin, said Thursday's arrest was another sign of how profoundly his Client was affected by the loss of his mother. Since the slaying, Fronstin said, Daniel Gorenberg had slipped into drug abuse as a means of coping. However, the attorney added, the son had been improving since his arrest in Delray Beach. It's a shame that the detectives are coming after him now. Fronstin said.

Palm Beach Post - September 20, 2007 / Silence Hurts Slaying Probe, Officials Say, By Michael Laforgia

Silence Hurts Slaying Probe, Officials Say

The mother and brother of a wealthy suburban Boca Raton woman who was murdered six months ago met with top sheriff's officials Wednesday to encourage cooperation between the victims family and frustrated detectives. Neither Stewart Gorenberg, 52, a Fort Lauderdale chiropractor, nor his 25 year old son, who last month was arrested on a prescription drug charge will speak to detectives. Instead they've directed all questions to Guy Fronstin, a West Palm Beach attorney whom Stewart Gorenberg hired after his wife's murder.

Palm Beach Post - August 29, 2007 / Slain Woman's Son faces Prescription Charge, By Michael Laforgia

Slain Woman's Son faces Prescription Charge

The son of Randi Gorenberg, the suburban Boca Raton woman who was fatally shot in the head and thrown from her black Mercedes west of the city in March, was arrested Monday on a prescription drug charge. Gorenberg's attorney, Guy Fronstin, said the arrest shows how profoundly his clint was affected by his mothers death. Fronstin said, He's been struggling every day since this murder. I think his arrest last night is an indication that Daniel's not thinking clearly. Fronstin said, I think it's got to be put in context.

Sun-Sentinel - July 7, 2007 / Palm Beach Warrant Report Raises Questions About Murder Victims Son, By Leon Fooksman

Palm Beach Warrant Report Raises Questions About Murder Victims Son

More than three months after his mother was mysteriously killed near a park west of Delray Beach, Daniel Gorenberg is still grieving every day, his family's attorney said.

"He's withdrawn and depressed," attorney Guy Fronstin said. "He and his mother were extremely close, as a son could be."

Yet the 5-year-old's behavior in the hours and days following the slaying of Randi Gorenberg, who lived west of Boca Raton, on March 23 continues to intrigue sheriff's detectives.

Two hours after the homicide, deputies spotted Daniel Gorenberg quickly driving his Volkswagen car into his parent's garage, opening the trunk and removing a spray bottle and roll of paper towels, according to a search warrant obtained by the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

Minutes later, he paced on his parent's driveway, ran his hands through his hair, smoked a cigarette and was "displaying visible signs of stress," the document said.

At that time, detectives had not notified the family that Randi Gorenberg was shot and pushed out of her Mercedes SUV at Gov. Lawton Chiles Memorial Park off Jog Road.

More questions followed the next day when Daniel Gorenberg turned over to investigators only some of the attire he wore on the day of his mother's death. Deputies saw him a day earlier wearing black shoes and a black belt, but he gave detectives white shoes and no belt, the document said.

Two days later, he claimed to have been working at a Boca Raton jewelry store at the time of the homicide, the warrant said.

The store had no record of him working there that day, the warrant said.

Sgt. Rick McAfee said Daniel Gorenberg is not a suspect in the high-profile slaying, which was featured on America's Most Wanted. There are no suspects yet, he said.

Still, McAfee said, he wants Daniel Gorenberg and his father, Fort Lauderdale-based chiropractor Dr. Stewart Gorenberg, to be more helpful. They have not been willing recently to sit down with detectives and answer more questions about their whereabouts that day, he said.

"We're in a tremendous bind," McAfee said.

Fronstin said the father and son already have answered questions in person and through a questionnaire. He acknowledged that Daniel Gorenberg's behaviors could be construed as suspicious but his actions are all explainable.

"Daniel has nothing to do with this," Fronstin said.

On March 23, Randi Gorenberg, 52, a mother of two who lived in a $2.2 million home in the Boniello Acres community west of Boca Raton, left the Town Center Mall in Boca Raton alone in her SUV at 1:16 p.m., detectives said.

At 1:54 p.m., a passer-by reported hearing two gunshots and seeing the mother's body pushed from her SUV.

Five minutes later, surveillance cameras captured the SUV entering the Home Depot parking lot at Atlantic Avenue and Jog Road. The vehicle was left there, but the cameras did not clearly show who was behind the wheel.

Detectives are still poring through surveillance footage, awaiting DNA analysis and considering working with the U.S. Attorney's Office to broaden the scope of the investigation, McAfee said. Yet the number of detectives assigned to the case has been reduced from six to two because there are other unsolved killings needing attention, he said.

The pace of the investigation has upset Randi Gorenberg's brother, Jerry Malitz, who lives in Washington, D.C.

The Sheriff's Office turned down his request for a copy of the Home Depot surveillance video so a family member with a production company could review it, he said. And detectives did not initially interview people the family recommended who could know something about the killing, he said.

"I'm frustrated both by the seemingly lack of progress and them seemingly not being as forthcoming with the family as they were the first week," Malitz said.

McAfee said the video was not handed over because his agency didn't want a family member reviewing it, a potential for a conflict in court if an arrest is make. Detectives have not talked to everyone Malitz's family suggested because they still want to talk further to Daniel and Stewart Gorenberg.

"The rhythm and rhyme of what we do to a layman may seem like we're dragging our feet. But there's a process we use and it's a thinking of two or three steps ahead," McAfee said.

Fronstin explained that there isn't anything unusual about Daniel Gorenberg pacing and smoking on the driveway of his parent's home. He's not allowed to smoke inside.

As for him failing to turn over his shoes and belt, the attorney said the son gave detectives everything he had. Investigators had a chance to go through his room in the three searches of the house, he said.

Fronstin declined to comment on why Daniel Gorenberg told detectives he was working at the store at the time of the homicide, even though detectives said he wasn't.

Malitz remembers his sister being a "champion" to Daniel Gorenberg and would always support him and care for him.

The son had studied criminology at the University of South Florida and planned to become a police officer, he said.

Crimeshots.com - April 11, 2007 / Mysterious Murder of Randi Gorenberg, By Gary Dee

Mysterious Murder of Randi Gorenberg

This is a partial transcript from "On the Record," April 6, 2007, that has been edited for clarity.

GRETA VAN SUSTEREN, HOST: There's new information tonight in the murder Randi Gorenberg, the wife of a Florida chiropractor. This video was taken in the last minutes of Randi's life as she left a Boca Raton mall. In the next 38 minutes, someone would shoot Randi and dump her body from her own Mercedes.

Now, this is surveillance video of that Mercedes only five minutes after Randi's body was thrown from it onto the street. Police still don't know who was driving the car, but there is new information tonight, newly-released clues found in the SUV.

For more on this, we're joined by Michael Laforgia, reporter for The Palm Beach Post. Michael, they have now searched her SUV I understand twice. Any clues, or what clues were found in that SUV?

MICHAEL LAFORGIA, PALM BEACH POST: Well unfortunately, Greta, the only thing that they've learned from the search is that this is probably a lot more complex than it first appeared.

VAN SUSTEREN: When you say more complex, are they -I mean, I know that they have a number -I hope they have a number of theories and they haven't focused simply on one at this point. But is carjacking sort of the top of the list on this one, or not?

LAFORGIA: I wouldn't say that anything is on the top of the list. I spoke to the captain of the violent crimes division today, and he said detectives aren't ruling anything out, everything from carjacking to the possibility that someone might have been stalking Randi Gorenberg and memorizing her every move.

VAN SUSTEREN: Do they have a suspicion she knew her killer or -I mean, beyond sort of a stalker, that it was someone she knew?

LAFORGIA: I don't know. They haven't told us that, and they're keeping a lot of this pretty close to the vest.

VAN SUSTEREN: A murder weapon -was that found in the SUV?

LAFORGIA: It was not found in the SUV. They only thing they really discovered was a spent shell casing. The rest was sort of mundane items that could have been in anybody's car, a compact disc, dryer sheets, that kind of thing.

VAN SUSTEREN: Anything missing that they would expect? Did she have any expensive jewelry, a wallet, anything missing that might suggest theft, that this was a crime that was at least a carjacking of some sort?

LAFORGIA: There are several items that are missing, but whether they were taken from the car or at some other time from her, it's not really clear. She's missing a purse. She had some sneakers on that they can't find. She was found -her body was found in the park. She was wearing only socks. Her wallet and her cell phone are missing, and they can't account for those, either.

VAN SUSTEREN: The purse -I know there was -I read some accounts about a $600 purse that's missing. Can -did the police say that she had it in that first video, on that surveillance video, so that they at least know that she had it at one point that day?

LAFORGIA: From the video we've seen, it's pretty clear that she was holding a purse in addition to several shopping bags. And you know, as of today, they haven't been able to find those bags, either.

VAN SUSTEREN: And I assume they've processed the car, looking for fingerprints or DNA for -she was tossed out of the passenger side?

LAFORGIA: Yes. A witness said that he heard two shots and saw her drop from the passenger side of the car before it took off. They did search for latent prints, and those are being tested probably as we speak. In terms of DNA, they took several swabs, and those take a few weeks before they'll come back.

VAN SUSTEREN: It's a terrible crime. Of course, all these murders are terrible crimes. Michael, thank you.

LAFORGIA: Thank you.

Malitz, 56, who works for the Institute of Education Sciences in Washington, had just gotten home from an evening out with his wife when the phone rang.

"They've killed Randi," said his mother, Idey Elias, from Florida. "Your sister," she said. "They've killed your sister."
"Who killed my sister?" Malitz said.
A pause.
"Monsters. "

In the coming days, Malitz's mother and niece, Gorenberg's daughter, would fall apart in front of TV cameras as they begged for help in solving the murder.

Meanwhile, Malitz said he logged on to Internet message boards and read anonymous postings that cast suspicion on Gorenberg's husband, Stewart, even while the man grieved for his wife.

From his office on K Street in Washington, Malitz dismissed the rumors. His sister didn't even have a life insurance policy, he said.

"I can honestly say it was nothing but happiness, laughter, fun, nice kidding around, that I've seen between Randi and Stew," Malitz said. "Randi never spoke to me about any issues."

"I don't think that's at all conceivable that he could have anything to do with it. That's unthinkable to me."

Gorenberg's husband and children declined to be interviewed for this story through their attorney, Guy Fronstin.

Malitz described his sister's life, and her family's desolation after her death.

In Gorenberg's eulogy on March 27, Malitz remembered walking hand-in-hand with his sister to school at Public School 208 in the East Flatbush section of Brooklyn. He recalled the wrestling matches they used to have while their parents were at work.

They spent their summers at Camp Impala in Woodburn, N.Y., where Gorenberg made an impression on her fellow campers.

Alan Finkel, Gorenberg's camp counselor for archery, rifle range and pioneering, remembers her as "a skinny kid with dark, short hair, just bouncing and smiling."

"She was a bubbly kid," said Finkel, 55.

Eventually, Malitz left for college in Washington; his younger sister stayed in Brooklyn, where she met Stewart Gorenberg at a hangout called The Alley.

The couple married in 1979 and moved to Davenport, Iowa, where Stewart finished chiropractic school before moving with his wife to suburban Boca Raton.

They had two children, Daniel and Sarie, and Randi Gorenberg's mother, Elias, moved to suburban Delray Beach to be near her daughter and grandchildren.

In Florida, Gorenberg was a wife and mother.

Even a stranger could tell how kind and devoted she was to her family, said Pam Kresse, who appraised the Gorenbergs' house for a new homeowners insurance policy about a month ago.

"You've got to see my pantry," Gorenberg told Kresse. The appraiser figured Gorenberg wanted to show off new cabinets or some upscale appliance.

Instead, she opened the cupboard doors to reveal rows and rows of empty coffee cans, maybe 50 in all. Her daughter was studying to become a teacher, Gorenberg said with pride. She had been saving the cans for Sarie Gorenberg's future students.

Gorenberg loved going to the beach, her brother said. Something about the sand and the sound of the waves and the vastness of the ocean appealed to her, Malitz said. Walks were part of her daily routine, he said, and she also developed a passion for flowers, especially orchids.

She often stopped in at Starbucks for a cup of coffee, detectives would learn, and she was a regular at the bagel shop in the shopping center near where she was killed .

On the morning of March 23, Stewart Gorenberg left the family's $2.2 million home in Boniello Acres for work at about 5:30, according to a search warrant affidavit. It was the last time he would see his wife alive. Daniel Gorenberg, 24, who lives with his parents, told investigators he last saw his mother at 8:45 a.m., the affidavit said.

Gorenberg drove the family's black Mercedes GL450 sport utility vehicle to the Town Center at Boca Raton, where she shopped at Old Navy and a music shop. She bought a John Legend album, Malitz said. A security camera captured her on her cell phone, most likely listening to a voice-mail message from a still-unidentified caller, as she left the mall from the entrance near Neiman Marcus, Malitz said.

Thirty-eight minutes later, at 1:54 p.m., a witness heard two gunshots and saw Gorenberg pushed from her Mercedes in the Gov. Lawton Chiles Memorial Park west of Delray Beach. She lay dead on the pavement, bleeding from a gunshot wound to her left temple.

At 1:59 p.m., a security camera outside Home Depot at Jog Road and West Atlantic Avenue, less than 2 miles from the crime scene, recorded Gorenberg's Mercedes driving in the parking lot.

Authorities found the blood-stained SUV behind the Home Depot an hour later. A search of the car turned up only a spent shell casing, though investigators were able to lift latent fingerprints and DNA swabs, according to court records. Tests are pending.

Missing from the car were Gorenberg's $600 Kooba purse, Puma sneakers, wallet and cellphone.

That night, a friend drove Stewart Gorenberg to Gainesville to tell his daughter, a student at the University of Florida, in person. Sarie Gorenberg, 21, already sensed something was wrong, Malitz said. She had tried again and again to reach her mom on her cellphone, but the call kept going straight to voice mail.

About a half-hour before her father reached Gainesville, Sarie Gorenberg learned about her mother's death in a text message sent to her cellphone. Malitz and his wife, Ruth Marcus, flew into Fort Lauderdale the next afternoon and stayed for a week.

In Florida, Malitz acted as a buffer between the Gorenbergs and the rest of the world. He answered the phones, did the majority of the talking with investigators and greeted visitors at the Gorenberg home west of Boca Raton.

As friends and family gathered to mourn, Malitz noticed Allie, the family's golden retriever, waiting by the door for his sister's return. After a while, she gave up.

Each morning at about 8, Stewart Gorenberg would push into the guest bedroom where Malitz and his wife were sleeping and sit at the foot of the bed.

"I don't know what I'm going to do," he would tell them, tears welling in his eyes. "I can't believe she's gone.

"This house is Randi. Everywhere I look is Randi." Malitz just let him talk.

So far, answers to key questions in the case have remained just beyond detectives' reach. No discernible motives and no suspects make it the archetypal murder mystery, said Sgt. Rick McAfee, whose five-man squad worked on the case for two weeks without a break. A minority of homicide cases fall into this category, he said.

Malitz returned to Washington on March 31.

There, he carefully considered every possible explanation for his sister's death.

"I've pictured this," he said. "Somebody's in the driver seat, Randi's in the passenger seat, and somebody had to have a gun right to Randy's temple." In the end, Malitz said, he hopes the investigators discover that Gorenberg was killed as part of some plot. The alternative, that she was the victim of random violence, would be too maddening to endure.

"I don't want to think that," he said. "I don't want to think that anything she could have done would have changed what happened that day."

Palm Beach Post - March 31, 2007 / Mystery, Agony Intensify in Killing, By Michael Laforgia

Mystery, Agony Intensify in Killing

Thirty-nine minutes before Randi Gorenberg was fatally shot in the head and dumped from her Mercedes SUV last week, a security camera at the Town Center mall in Boca Raton captured a series of now haunting images.

The grainy video shows Gorenberg, 52, leaving the mall at 1: 15 p.m., shopping bags in hand. After a few paces, she pauses to lift a cell phone to her ear. She walks slowly, as if talking to someone or listening to a voice mail.

Randi Gorenberg's last hour Through video surveillance and interviews, authorities have pieced together some of what happened before and after Gorenberg was shot, killed and dumped from her SUV on March 23.

1:16 p.m.: Video captures Gorenberg leaving the Town Center mall in Boca Raton. She is walking toward the parking lot, carrying two shopping bags near the valet parking zone.

1:54: A witness hears two gunshots and sees Gorenberg being pushed from a Mercedes SUV near Gov. Lawton Chiles Park behind the South County Civic Center in suburban Delray Beach. She is not wearing shoes.

1:59: A surveillance camera records the Mercedes in a Home Depot parking lot at Atlantic A venue and Jog Road, less than 2 miles from the shooting scene.

Around 3: A deputy finds the Mercedes parked behind the Home Depot. The interior is spattered with blood, but authorities will not say whether anything else is found inside the car. Authorities say Gorenberg's shoes, purse and cellphone are missing. They will not comment on the shopping bags.

Missing from her Mercedes, discovered an hour later behind a nearby shopping plaza, were her $600 Kooba purse, her black-and-white Puma sneakers and her cellphone.

As homicide detectives puzzled over the case this week, the woman's family choked on its grief.

"My daughter was brutally murdered, thrown out of a vehicle with a bullet in her head," Idey Elias, Gorenberg's mother, said during a news conference Friday at the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office headquarters. " I ask mothers, daughters, grandmothers: Please help us find this murderer, this monster who did this to my darling Randi."

At her side, the victim's 21-year-old daughter, Sarie, begged for help in solving the case.

"My mom would help you, she would do anything to help anyone," she said, her face twisted in agony and "If there's anything you saw or heard, or anything ... "

Gorenberg's husband, Stewart, 52, and son, Daniel, 24, were elsewhere in the building during the news conference. Neither felt composed enough to go before the cameras, said Guy Fronstin, a West Palm Beach attorney' they hired after the killing.

There's been a lot of tears in this family," Fronstin said. "They'd like to see whoever did this arrested, taken off the streets and locked up."

At 1:54 p.m. March 23, a witness saw Gorenberg's black Mercedes SUV stop in a park behind the South County Civic Center in suburban Delray Beach, heard two gunshots and saw Gorenberg pushed to the street.

Five minutes later, at a Home Depot at Jog Road and Atlantic Avenue, a security camera trained on the southeast corner of the parking lot recorded a black Mercedes SUV flashing by and turning left toward Atlantic Avenue before leaving the frame.

A sheriffs community service aide found the bloodstained Mercedes behind the hardware store, less than 2 miles from the crime scene, about an hour after the shooting. The Mercedes was processed for evidence and towed to the sheriffs office impound lot, where it remains.

Since then, homicide detectives have lost sleep, come in on days off, pushed the limits of their endurance -and still seemed no closer to making an arrest Friday.

On Sunday, crime scene investigators pulled a bullet fragment from the roadside where Gorenberg was dropped in Gov. Lawton Chiles Memorial Park.

On Wednesday, a day after Gorenberg's funeral at a synagogue west of Boca Raton, homicide detectives got a search warrant and arrived unannounced to search the Gorenbergs' $2.2 million home in suburban Boca Raton, displacing mourners as investigators scoured the house.

The next morning, two sheriffs divers took turns groping along the muddy bottom of a retention pond behind the Home Depot in an unsuccessful search for the murder weapon.

Specialists hoping to glimpse the killer's face Friday were working to digitally enhance the five-second clip of the Mercedes driving in the Home Depot parking lot, sheriffs Capt. Jack Strenges said.

Aside from the video clips, authorities have released few details about the investigation.

Detectives wouldn't say whether they found fingerprints, shopping bags or other evidence inside the SUV, nor would they say whether they had studied Gorenberg's cellphone records.

Investigators also had yet to account for Gorenberg's cellphone, purse and shoes -she was found wearing white socks, blue jeans and a green shirt.

One week later, authorities wouldn't say whether the killing appeared spontaneous or planned.

"We can't comment about that," said Paul Miller, sheriffs office spokesman.

Anyone with information about the shooting should call Palm Beach County sheriffs Sgt. Rick McAfee at (561) 688-4012.

Sun-Sentinel - March 31, 2007 / Family Pleads for help, By Jerome Burdi

Family Pleads for help

The mother and daughter of the woman slain a week ago cried uncontrollably, begging for the public's help in the hunt for her killer. Detectives are going through surveillance videos to see if they can help find the killer. Family Attorney Guy Fronstin said There has to be one person out there who can break this case open. That is the sole objective of this family now Our goal is to get the public talking about it.

Sun-Sentinel - March 31, 2007 / A Search For Answers, Family Pleads for Help, Daughter, Mother of murdered woman turning to the public, By Jerome Burdi

A Search For Answers
Family Pleads for Help
Daughter, mother of murdered woman turning to the public

The mother and daughter of the woman slain a week ago cried uncontrollably, begging for the public's help in the hunt for her killer.

"My mom would help you," wailed Sarie Gorenberg, 21.

As Palm Beach County Sheriff's Capt. Jack Strenges told what detectives know of Randi Gorenberg's final hour, Idey Elias and her granddaughter overshadowed his voice with the emotion of their loss.

"My daughter was brutally murdered, thrown out of a vehicle with a bullet in her head," Elias said. "Help us find this monster who did this to my darling daughter, Randi. He took the life of a beautiful woman who was so good."

Elias shook with her pleas.

"Help us," she said. "Please help us."

Detectives are going through surveillance videos to see if they can help find the killer in Gorenberg's black 2007 Mercedes Benz GL450 sport utility vehicle.

At 1:16 p.m. March 23, surveillance cameras captured Gorenberg leaving the Town Center mall in Boca Raton near Neiman Marcus and talking on a cell phone. Detectives think Gorenberg made it to her car safely, but don't know what happened after that.

"We're keeping an open mind on this. I'll leave it at that," Strenges said during a news conference Friday.

At 1: 54 p.m., a witness heard gunshots and saw Gorenberg pushed from her Mercedes at Gov. Lawton Chiles Memorial Park, on Morikami Park Road and Jog Road west of Delray Beach, about five miles from the mall.

At 1:59 p.m., surveillance cameras captured the SUV entering the Home Depot parking lot at Atlantic Avenue and Jog Road, less than two miles from the park. Detectives found the Mercedes shortly after, behind the Home Depot. The gun and Gorenberg's Puma sneakers and brown Kooba purse are missing.

Detectives have searched Gorenberg's Boniello Acres home west of Boca Raton and the retention pond behind Home Depot.

Gorenberg, 52, who also had a son, Daniel, was married to Stewart Gorenberg, also 52, a chiropractor at the Fort Lauderdale Accident and Injury Center. Stewart Gorenberg was not at the news conference. The Gorenberg family has offered $10,000 for information leading to an arrest.

"There has to be one person out there who can break this case open," family Guy Fronstin said. "That is the sole objective of this family now. Our goal is to get the public talking about it."

In a written statement late Friday, Town Center general manager Sam Hosn said, "The safety of our shoppers and tenants is always our foremost concern."

He declined to comment on any details of the case.

Strenges said Gorenberg's family wanted to come forward.

"The mother is never going to be the same again, the daughter is never going to be the same again," Strenges said.

Anyone with information should call Sgt. Rick McAfee at 561-688-4012 or Crime Stoppers at 800-458-8477.

Johndougleas Mindhunter.com - March 23, 2007 / FBI profilers see psychological clues to Boca Mall Killer, By Gary Dee

FBI profilers see psychological clues to Boca Mall Killer

On March 23, 2007, Randi Gorenberg's day was quite typical. She spoke with her daughter on the cell phone, called some friends, then shopped at the Town Center mall in Boca Raton, located in Palm Beach County. On the surveillance video, you can see Randi leave the mall and stop briefly where she is checking her cell phone. Police have no suspect, no sketch and very little to go on. After nearly a year of searching for her shoes, purse and other belongings, nothing surfaced. Meanwhile, her husband, Stew, has been silent throughout the investigation. His lawyer, Guy Fronstin, says, I can't allow him to talk while the police investigation is going on. He adds, This is very difficult for my Client and the family hopes for closure.